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Become a Public Relations Excecutive

Home > Career Training > What To Do Now? > What To Do Now? Public Relations Excecutive Career Training

In a down economy, businesses and organizations need to put their best face forward. Public relations executives are in charge of campaigns that strategically present their clients to the world. If you enjoy interacting with people, thinking creatively, and solving problems, you might want to explore how to retrain in public relations. Online public relations training courses are one way to improve your skills for this growing career.

Public Relations Executive Career Skills

Public relations executives oversee projects to publicize and shape the reputation of their clients. All kinds of organizations from non-profit groups to the government and Fortune 500 companies want to present themselves in the best possible light. Public relations executives are hired to interface with customers and other stakeholders. These professionals know how to communicate both with their clients, the media, and the community that uses their clients' services and products.

Career skills for public relations executives include strategic thinking, creativity, project management, public speaking, and excellent communication skills. Additionally, you must be able to understand patterns and see the "big picture." Knowledge of media and marketing are important as is an understanding the client's industry or service. Public relations executives are leaders who sometimes manage a staff of public relations specialists.

Career Advice for Public Relations Executives

An undergraduate degree is generally the entry point for a career as a public relations executive. Internships or paid experience in the field can be very helpful for advancement into management positions, as can retraining to gain further education. One way to improve your skills conveniently is through online public relations executive training courses.

Career Outlook

  • Median Annual Salary. In May 2013, the public relations specialists earned a median annual salary of $63,020 with top 10% making more than $103,240.
  • Top Paying States. District of Columbia, Virginia, California, Maryland, New Jersey.
  • States with Highest Employment. New York, California, Texas, District of Columbia, Pennsylvania.
  • What It Takes. Individuals who possess strong skill sets in communication, creativity, writing, and computer use, and have related working experience have the best opportunities for jobs
  • Climbing the Ladder. Since these jobs are seen as key spots within companies and are high profile in nature, managers are often considered for advancement and promotion opportunities
  • What to Expect. These jobs may require a substantial degree of travel, long work hours, plus weekend and evening work
  • Job Responsibilities. Public relations managers draft speeches for company executives, schedule interviews, respond to requests for information, maintain open communication lines with the press and media, and perform other related duties, as needed
  • Typical Education. Some firms prefer candidates with a bachelor's or master's degree in journalism or public relations.
  • Traditional Public Relations Courses. Courses of study often include public affairs, business administration, public speaking, writing, and political science

Sources:
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Public Relations Specialists
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Public Relations Specialists, May 2013 Wages