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Online Nursing Programs in North Carolina

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Stunning mountains, sandy dunes, laid-back countryside. And don't forget the barbecue. North Carolina has it all, including many opportunities for someone interested in attending a North Carolina online nursing school.

According to the North Carolina Board of Nursing, there were 108,747 registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) employed in the state as of November 2016. Although that number may seem large, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported in 2014 that North Carolina was one of the three states expected to have the largest shortfall of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses by 2025.

Nurse Salaries in North Carolina

Those already working in North Carolina as registered nurses enjoyed a mean annual salary of $60,460 in 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And those working as licensed practical nurses made an annual mean wage of $41,940. Of course, salaries may vary depending on location in the state.

  • In the Piedmont (nonmetropolitan) area, annual mean wages for registered nurses were $56,990.
  • In the Southeast Coastal (nonmetropolitan) area, annual mean wages for registered nurses were $55,650.

What To Expect At Online Nursing Schools In North Carolina?

There are a number of state and federal incentives for nursing students right now, so it's a great time to explore North Carolina online nursing schools. If you're already a resident of North Carolina, for example, you may be eligible for the Student Loan Program for Health, Science and Mathematics.

Whether you take advantage of the incentives or not, online nursing schools in North Carolina have a number of benefits for people looking to get a nursing degree, specialize in a certain practice area or just complete a few Continuing Education Credits (CEUs). Most North Carolina online nursing schools offer a good deal of flexibility, letting you take prerequisite courses on your own schedule, wherever you can find an Internet connection. And if you need clinical experience or just some actual face-time with peers and faculty, many schools provide hybrid programs that add an on-site component to the curriculum.

Sources:

  • The Future of the Nursing Workforce, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, December 2014, http://bhw.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/bhw/nchwa/projections/nursingprojections.pdf
  • May 2015 State Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates for North Carolina, Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_nc.htm
  • North Carolina Board of Nursing, https://www.ncbon.com/

Online Nursing Programs in North Carolina